Adam and Eve

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“There is the old idea of devas and asuras – divine beings or Gods, and the titans – struggling to control human evolution. The Asuras are responsible for the great complexity of the world, but in my opinion they are not a necessity. The Asuras realise themselves through revolt, suffering, struggle, and difficulty. But the world could have evolved differently – more like a flower blooming from inside to outside. But the forces of the Asura-type entered the universal play of forces and perverted it. This is the truth known to almost all the religions: the snake – the evil – tempting Prakriti – Eve; Prakriti deceiving Purusha – Adam. The Purusha consented and they fell: this they speak of as the fall of Adam, the cosmic man.
         In India this struggle – as to who should control the course of human evolution – between the Devas and the Asuras, expresses the same truth.”[1]


“If all is in truth Sachchidananda, death, suffering, evil, limitation can only be the creations, positive in practical effect, negative in essence, of a distorting consciousness which has fallen from the total and unifying knowledge of itself into some error of division and partial experience. This is the fall of man typified in the poetic parable of the Hebrew Genesis. That fall is his deviation from the full and pure acceptance of God and himself, or rather of God in himself, into a dividing consciousness which brings with it all the train of the dualities, life and death, good and evil, joy and pain, completeness and want, the fruit of a divided being. This is the fruit which Adam and Eve, Purusha and Prakriti, the soul tempted by Nature, have eaten. The redemption comes by the recovery of the universal in the individual and of the spiritual term in the physical consciousness. Then alone the soul in Nature can be allowed to partake of the fruit of the tree of life and be as the Divine and live for ever. For then only can the purpose of its descent into material consciousness be accomplished, when the knowledge of good and evil, joy and suffering, life and death has been accomplished through the recovery by the human soul of a higher knowledge which reconciles and identifies these opposites in the universal and transforms their divisions into the image of the divine Unity.”[2]




  1. Evening Talks with Sri Aurobindo, p.458, “On the Gods and Asuras”, 1 June 1926
  2. The Synthesis of Yoga, p.56, “The Ego and the Dualities”


See also